Review: D'Addario NS Artist Capo

I’d somehow managed to avoid using a capo my entire career, until a memorial gig requested I perform the Beatles’ “Here Comes the Sun.”
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I’d somehow managed to avoid using a capo my entire career, until a memorial gig requested I perform the Beatles’ “Here Comes the Sun.” I found the chords online, of course, but got a wake-up call when the other guitarist said, “Cool—capo at the 7th fret.” Ack. Thanks a lot, George Harrison! But any trepidation over using a “string clamp” dissipated almost immediately, when I deployed the NS Artist Capo ($17 street) that D’Addario had given me to deliver to GP’s Matt Blackett while covering the Winter NAMM show. (Sorry, Matt, I decided to keep it.) The trigger-style operation made using the Artist Capo quick and easy. I could position it on the guitar neck, take it off, clamp it to the headstock so I wouldn’t lose it, and then put it back on the neck practically without thinking. Tuning integrity was spot-on. I didn’t notice any sour intonation at any time I used the capo— even with those open “Beatle” chords played so far up the neck. I never had occasion to use the micrometer-adjustment mechanism that helps prevent string buzz, because, right out of the packaging and onto my Gretsch Rancher acoustic, the Artist Capo didn’t cause any buzzing issues. The capo’s performance was just as flawless on my Epiphone Dot semi-hollowbody, when I decided, post-memorial, to try playing an electric version of the song, as well as fool around with capo positions and chord inversions. There are actually a lot of textures to discover when you start moving that thing up and down the neck. Who knew? Call me converted! The NS Artist Capo also comes with a pick holder and a mounting bracket for a D’Addario NS Micro Headstock Tuner (not included).
planetwaves.com

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