Double Stops: Five Slick Licks to Double Your Pleasure

Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0
Image placeholder title

#1. This double-stop lick would feel right at home on CMT. It borrows notes from both the A major (A B C# E F#) and A minor (A C D E G) pentatonic scales and should be played at a moderate-to-fast tempo. Be sure to let the last three notes ring to spell out an A7 chord.

Image placeholder title

#2. This entire lick is based on 6th intervals. To execute it correctly, use your pick or thumb for notes on the 3rd string and your middle or ring finger for notes on the 1st string. Note the “shuffle rhythm” symbol above the staff, which calls for the eighth notes to be “swung.”

Image placeholder title

#3. Chuck Berry made this type of double-stop lick famous in the Fifties when rock and roll was still in its infancy. Notice the triplet rhythms played throughout. To execute these properly, count “tri-pl-et” for each beat. This lick is ideal when moving from the I chord to the IV chord—in this case, A to D.

Image placeholder title

#4. The double-stop hammer-ons incorporated into this lick are similar to those found in Jimi Hendrix’s “Little Wing.” Play this phrase slowly, paying close attention to the eighth- and 16th-note rhythms.

Image placeholder title

#5. This lick involves some tricky oblique string bends. Be sure to keep the fretted notes on the 1st and 2nd strings stationary while you’re bending. Otherwise, they’ll sound out of tune and you won’t achieve the proper “pedal steel” sound.

Image placeholder title

RELATED