Watch the Claypool Lennon Delirium’s Deliriously Wonderful House of Blues Performance

 Sean Lennon and Les Claypool visit the SiriusXM Studio on May 23, 2016 in New York City.
(Image credit: Cindy Ord/Getty Images)

The combination of Primus bass player Les Claypool and Sean Lennon was almost guaranteed to generate something off-the-wall and unworldly.

Claypool’s left-field sense of humor was apparent in his work with Primus (opens in new tab), and Lennon had already dabbled in music that challenged the boundaries of the conventional with his band the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger (opens in new tab).

Claypool said of Lennon, “He plays things that I wasn’t expecting, and that always intrigues me.”

Claypool Lennon Delirium

Released in 2016, Monolith of Phobos (opens in new tab) is the Claypool Lennon Delirium's debut studio album. (Image credit: ATO Records)

The first Claypool Lennon Delirium album, Monolith of Phobos (opens in new tab), was released in 2016. 

Underpinned by Claypool’s gargantuan sound and thunderous grooves, Lennon revealed himself on the disc as an endlessly creative guitarist, fearlessly unleashing dexterously liquid electric guitar lines that constantly defy expectations, often while using a BilT Revelator with built-in effects (opens in new tab).

Best described as prog-meets-psych (with a dash of funk and pop), their music is so varied that no two songs sound alike.

Claypool Lennon Delirium

Released in 2019, South of Reality (opens in new tab) is the Claypool Lennon Delirium's second studio album. (Image credit: ATO Records)

The band’s second album, South of Reality (opens in new tab), released in 2019, refines their vision into a more cohesive overall project. While nothing on the album could be called conventional, the songs are full of infectious hooks and memorable solos that keep one’s interest even as the tracks extend past the six-minute mark.

It is easy to see why Lennon’s primary influence as a guitarist was Hendrix, and perhaps inevitably, given Lennon’s heritage, there is even a hint of the Beatles own forays into the realms of psych.

Featuring interviews with Claypool and Lennon, this concert film from the House of Blues in Boston, MA, showcases the band in fine form.

Browse the Claypool Lennon Delirium catalog here (opens in new tab).

Mark McStea

Mark is a freelance writer with particular expertise in the fields of ‘70s glam, punk, rockabilly and classic ‘50s rock and roll. He sings and plays guitar in his own musical project, Star Studded Sham, which has been described as sounding like the hits of T. Rex and Slade as played by Johnny Thunders. He had several indie hits with his band, Private Sector and has worked with a host of UK punk luminaries. Mark also presents themed radio shows for Generating Steam Heat. He has just completed his first novel, The Bulletproof Truth, and is currently working on the sequel.