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The Peavey HP2 is Back

Peavey HP2
(Image credit: Peavey )

Peavey has announced that it is resurrecting its popular HP2 guitar.

Featuring a carved maple top and basswood back and sides with cream edge binding accents, a 25.5-inch scale, a bolt-on birdseye maple neck, a fingerboard cut from a single piece of wood and a contoured neck heel, the HP2 will now be manufactured by "some of the best luthiers in Europe," according to the company's founder and CEO, Hartley Peavey. 

Additionally, Peavey said, "the first 400 builds will be New Old Stock made from wood that’s been aging since the 1990s.” 

Peavey HP2 in Moonglow

(Image credit: Peavey)

Sonically, the HP2 packs two custom-wound Peavey humbuckers mounted directly to the body, controlled by a Switchcraft three-way toggle and two push-pull knobs, for volume and tone. 

The guitar is also outfitted with Schaller tuners with pearloid buttons and a Peavey/Floyd Rose licensed double-locking tremolo.

Production of the HP2 – which owes a significant stylistic debt to the defunct, Eddie Van Halen signature Peavey Wolfgang line – was halted in the United States earlier this year after the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, and its accompanying effects on manufacturing. 

Peavey had been struggling (opens in new tab) to keep up with demand for the guitar as it was, and took the forced downtime to find a European manufacturer that could produce HP2s at the necessary clip, while maintaining the previous building standards of the instrument.

Peavey HP2 in Tiger Eye

(Image credit: Peavey)

The Peavey HP2 guitar is available for preorder now – in Black, Deep Ocean, Tiger Eye and Moonburst finishes – for $2,499.99.

For more info on the guitar, stop by peavey.com (opens in new tab).

Jackson Maxwell
Jackson Maxwell

Jackson is an Associate Editor at GuitarWorld.com and GuitarPlayer.com. He’s been writing and editing stories about new gear, technique and guitar-driven music both old and new since 2014, and has also written extensively on the same topics for Guitar Player. Elsewhere, his album reviews and essays have appeared in Louder and Unrecorded. Though open to music of all kinds, his greatest love has always been indie, and everything that falls under its massive umbrella. To that end, you can find him on Twitter crowing about whatever great new guitar band you need to drop everything to hear right now.