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Hendrix Fans Demand Release of “Holy Grail of Lost Films” Documenting Final U.K. Performance

Jimi Hendrix performs with the Jimi Hendrix Experience at the Royal Albert Hall in London on 24th February 1969.
Jimi Hendrix performs with the Jimi Hendrix Experience at London's Royal Albert Hall on February 24, 1969. (Image credit: David Redfern/Redferns)

On this day, in 1969, the original Jimi Hendrix Experience line-up featuring bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell performed for the final time on British soil at London’s Royal Albert Hall.

This historic concert was captured on film and a screening of the enhanced footage was exhibited at the Royal Albert Hall itself in October 2019, some 50 years after the show took place.

Titled The Jimi Hendrix Experience: The Royal Albert Hall this infamous concert recording has “long been considered the holy grail of ‘lost’ films,” according to the official Jimi Hendrix website.

“It has never before been released on any format nor commercially screened anywhere in the world,” reads the event’s promotional literature. “It has remained unseen and been the subject of death, litigation and intrigue since its creation fifty years ago.”

Jimi Hendrix performs with the Jimi Hendrix Experience at the Royal Albert Hall in London on 24th February 1969.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience performing what would be their last European concert at London's Royal Albert Hall on February 24, 1969. (Image credit: David Redfern/Redferns)

Featuring a remastered soundtrack mixed by Hendrix’s recording engineer Eddie Kramer, the color-corrected film captures this historic performance by the Jimi Hendrix Experience as well as backstage footage and scenes shot in the aftermath of the riotous London show.

Later in ‘69, Redding parted ways with the band amid personal tensions, while Mitchell continued performing with Hendrix, including the guitarist’s unforgettable Woodstock appearance. He was replaced the following year by drummer Buddy Miles who featured alongside bassist Billy Cox on Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys 1970 live album.

Bootlegs and unofficial low-quality YouTube snippets aside, there is little to see of this revamped Hendrix flick aside from a frustratingly enticing one-minute-fourteen-seconds-long trailer.

Meanwhile, fans are screaming out for an official release (read the YouTube comments section for a measure of their current level of frustration!) 

For now, we can only hope a digital release is in the pipeline…

Rod Brakes is a music writer with an expertise in all things guitar-related. Having spent many years at the coalface as a guitar dealer and tech, Rod's more recent work as a journalist covering artists, industry pros and gear includes writing hundreds of articles and features for the likes of Guitarist, Total Guitar, Guitar World, Guitar Player and MusicRadar, as well as contributions for specialist books, blogs and social media. He is also a lifelong musician.