See Pink Floyd’s “Comfortably Numb” Played on a Harp Guitar

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David Gilmour recently returned to Pompeii, the site of an iconic 1971 Pink Floyd recording made at an ancient Roman amphitheater. Gilmour’s performance there last week marked a historic return, but unfortunately videos of the show have been difficult to find. (Note this exception.)

Instead, we are happy to bring you this video which we consider equally deserving of your attention. In it, guitarist Jamie Dupuis performs the Pink Floyd classic “Comfortably Numb” on a harp guitar, and the result is stunning.

“‘Comfortably Numb’ has always been one of my all time favourite songs, so I decided to make my own cover of it,” Dupuis writes. “I thought the harp guitar would work well with this song. Also for the ending solo I thought it would sound best on electric so I looped the chords and played the solo on my Fender Strat.”

We’ve featured Jamie here before playing Coldplay’s “Clocks” on a harp guitar. When you’re done, visit his YouTube channel for more of his videos.

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