mobile ad
mobile ad

Dean Markley introduces Pure Nickel Strings

February 19, 2014
share
Dean Markley USA has added new pure nickel guitar strings to its Helix line. Helix strings are made with a new patented hyper-elliptical winding technique, creating a tighter wrap and more mass, which seals the strings without the need for coating. By using pure nickel, the strings will offer a warmer, clearer tone all while extending the life of the string.
 
Pure nickel strings have long been sought after by guitarists in pursuit of the ultimate tone.  But manufacturers have stopped manufacturing or limit their production due to the high cost. The Dean Markley team takes a different approach and firmly believes in giving the musician every tool they need to achieve their goals. Pure nickel strings immediately start out with a warm tone and keep their tone much longer than strings using other materials. Besides being easier on the frets and gentler to the touch, pure nickel creates less distortion allowing tone aficionados to clearly distinguish notes within chords and high speed run-throughs of scales and arpeggios. 
 
It took over a year of many trials to find just the precise elliptical shape for the winding wire. This shape then had to be paired with the correct winding process. The hyper-elliptical winding process results in an increased number of wraps along the length of the string. This increases the mass of the string, without changing its diameter or material. More mass makes a fuller tone; more windings give a smoother feel as well as a brighter, more resonant tone. Additional benefits of the hyper-elliptical windings is a more relaxed feel, less squeak and sliding noise and the strings last much longer.
 
MSRP: $18.99 USD
 
For more information, please visit www.deanmarkley.com.

You Might Also Like...

Strings & Things
Strings & Things
Alert to All Users of the Disqus commenting system:
Because of a recent global security issue, the Disqus website recommends that all users change their Disqus passwords. Here's a URL about the issue: http://engineering.disqus.com/2014/04/10/heartbleed.html

COMMENTS

comments powered by Disqus

Reader Poll

What's the gauge of your 1st string?







See results without voting »