Lyle Workman on Getting Strange and Beautiful Tones - GuitarPlayer.com

Lyle Workman on Getting Strange and Beautiful Tones

ANY OF US CAN PLUG A STRAT INTO A MARSHALL AND stick an SM57 on the 4x12. Here, soundtrack star, composer, and guitarist Lyle Workman details some slightly less orthodox methods for getting cool tones.
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ANY OF US CAN PLUG A STRAT INTO A MARSHALL AND stick an SM57 on the 4x12. Here, soundtrack star, composer, and guitarist Lyle Workman details some slightly less orthodox methods for getting cool tones.

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“One of the best guitar sounds was when I was working with Bill Bottrell and he put a ribbon mic fairly close to the cabinet in a traditional location, then had a Shure SM57 three feet in front but pointing away from the amp. I’ve had my amp miked from behind the open-back cabinet and that sounded great. For a solo, producer Todd Rundgren ran my guitar through a vocoder and was tweaking it in real time while it was being recorded. Once I miked the pass through—a tube in the studio wall to allow cables to pass between rooms. My amps were in the tracking room and I placed a microphone at the opening of the pass through tube in the control room. Another time, an engineer swung a mic on a cable around and around over his head, rodeo fashion, while I soloed. I put a large wooden spoon near the bridge and under the strings to produce a sitar-type effect. I’m also not against putting masking tape on certain strings to prevent ringing on heavily gained-out parts. While playing through a chord progression, I’ve had my engineer put a finger or two on the neck to achieve a chord voicing that would be impossible otherwise.”

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