Accessory File: Slinger Straps Hip Strap, Sling Strap, and Harness Strap Reviewed

Are you nervous about playing long sets with your Les Paul because it portends a “pain relief” session lying flat on the couch the next morning?
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Are you nervous about playing long sets with your Les Paul because it portends a “pain relief” session lying flat on the couch the next morning? Do your shoulders and neck ache after bouncing around stages? You may be a prime candidate for Slinger Straps’ ergonomic line of guitar straps.

The Hip Strap ($29 direct) employs a waist-belt-designed guitar strap to completely remove the weight of a guitar or bass from your shoulders. Some modification is required. You will need to install a strap button on the lower bout of your guitar in order to ensure the Hip Strap holds your instrument at an optimal playing position. If you’re not ready to go 100-percent “waist-ed” (or don’t wish to drill an additional strap button into your baby), the Sling Strap ($39 direct) combines a waist belt and a reverse-shoulder strap to alleviate stress on your upper torso. For maximum support, the Harness Strap ($59 direct) utilizes a waist belt and double shoulder straps. No modifications are needed for the Sling and Harness straps.

All three models definitely do the job of making guitars and basses seem practically weightless, and they can help make your performances more comfy, enjoyable, and even pain free. Depending on your taste, however, these straps can either look way cool and unique, or they simply won’t be your thing at all. Also, as opposed to standard straps, some of your guitar god/goddess moves can be difficult while buckled into the enhanced support of a Slinger Strap.

But these considerations are mere trifles if you’re playing in pain. Stop the discomfort. Choose the right Slinger Strap, and spring onstage like Superman. slingerstraps.com

STOP OVERTHINKING!

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“The tone is in my hands and the attitude is in my heart, and I can’t change that,” Pat Benatar guitarist Neil Giraldo told GP in 2004. “So what I do when I play and/or arrange guitar parts is not to think about what I’m doing. If I did, I’d probably lose whatever I was trying to do. I’d screw up, or slow down, or play the wrong thing. I have a ‘Last Man Standing’ kind of approach to playing: This is what I am, this is what I do, and I’m happy to do it.”

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