Zarley Announces New Line of Wide-Neck Guitars

April 24, 2012
img
Zarley Wide Neck Guitars announced today the first of its new line of wide neck guitars, the Reserve. Designed for musicians with bigger hands, the Reserve is a new take on a classic single cut design. The width of the neck is increased to 1 7/8" (47.625mm) at the nut providing the player an increased string spacing of 0.315" (8mm) for best execution of single note runs. This also allows for all notes in a chord to ring clear.

Equipped with the traditional dual humbucker set up, the Reserve also features a stop tailpiece with bridge, two volumes, two tone controls, three way switch, hardwood body, maple top, rosewood fingerboard, a maple set in neck and a 24¾" scale for ease of playability. Optional finishes include brown maple, glossy black, blueburst and cherry sunburst.
 
Zarley Wide Neck Guitars is founded by Tracy Todd. After struggling for years playing off the shelf guitars. Todd started taking lessons later in life. Playing was a struggle because his large hands and fingers constantly created issues with muted strings. He tried virtually every electric guitar on the market. He even pursued the idea of a custom neck, but found the pricing to be incredibly high for what he needed. Through additional discussions with fellow musicians, chats on forums and reaching out to other manufacturers; the realization came clear that there was a segment of the guitar market not being addressed. After further research, trial and error, he has come upon a design that not only benefits the taller than average. It is something finger pickers can appreciate, also. The guitar may prove helpful to beginners. The wider string spacing has shown to make learning a little easier for those first starting out.
MSRP: $798
Factory Direct Price: $399
 
For more information, please visit www.zarleywideneckguitars.com
Keep up-to-date on the latest news
Get our Free Newsletter Here!

COMMENTS

comments powered by Disqus

Reader Poll

Best Distortion Pedal






See results without voting »