August 5, 2010

gp0810_gear_0987The jumbo-sized T400 12-string weds a solid Sitka-spruce top with laminated Indonesian rosewood back and sides. The mahogany set neck is a multi-section affair with a threepiece heel along with a glued-on headstock that wears a rosewood facing with “LÂG” inlaid in maple. The neck’s satin finish feels nice, though some excess glue can be seen on both sides of the nut (which also has some very sharp corners), as well along the seams where the fretboard joins the top, and where the heel meets the body. The body fares better with its clean high-gloss finish, but there are numerous places on the sides where light-colored filler can be seen in the grain. On the plus side, the neatly installed thin maple bindings that surround the top and back, and the rosewood rosette with its inset maple cross are classy details.

The factory Elixir strings load through holes in the rear of the elegant rosewood bridge, which makes for faster string changes, as you don’t have to deal with sticky end pins. A compensated saddle (which houses a Nanoflex piezo pickup) made from a black resin material helps the T400 to sound musically tuneful when chording in various positions. And speaking of tuning, the smooth-rolling die-cast machines pull the strings up to pitch easily, while the built-in tuner (which mutes the sound when activated) is accurate and easy to use.

gp0810_gear_0990The T400J12CE’s compensated saddle makes for sweet intonation.

The T400’s wide, medium-thick neck feels comfy, though the fret ends feel a little spiky, and the frets themselves could stand some polishing. Other than that, the instrument plays well, and the action is low and buzz free. Strummed acoustically, the T400 has a bright sound and an upfront, but non-honky midrange. The low end is almost nonexistent, however, which is surprising considering the depth and size of the body. Plugging into a Genz-Benz Shenandoah acoustic amp restored some of the missing bass frequencies, but I was dogged by annoying feedback rumbles—even at low volumes—that could not be stopped by muting strings. Activating the preamp’s Bypass button made the feedback diminish slightly, but this also deactivated the 5-position tone switch, which in positions 3 and 4 yielded some the T400’s most balanced sounds. The T400 plays well and intonates solidly, but its finish issues, weak low end, and feedback howls were troubling.




CONTACT LÂG Guitars (distributed by Korg USA); usa.lagguitars.com

PRICE $975 retail/street price N/A


NECK Mahogany

FRETBOARD Indonesian Rosewood

FRETS 20 medium-jumbo nickel (14 clear of the body)

TUNERS Lubricated high precision tuners with tulip buttons

BODY Indonesian Rosewood back and sides, solid Sitka spruce top

BRIDGE Indonesian Rosewood string-through style with compensated saddle

ELECTRONICS StudioLâg Plus preamp, Nanoflex Piezo


WEIGHT 5.34 lbs.

KUDOS Good playability. Excellent intonation. Attractive.

CONCERNS Weak bass. Low-frequency feedback.

More from this Lag Roundup:

Lâg Tramontane Series
Keep up-to-date on the latest news
Get our Free Newsletter Here!


comments powered by Disqus

Reader Poll

Best amp from the 1960s?

See results without voting »