Schertler David

January 14, 2008

Pumping out a healthy 80 watts in bi-amp configuration (the woofer and tweeter receive 50 and 30 watts respectively), the David gives you two independent channels—one sporting a 1/4" input (along with selectable 10-volt phantom power) and the other offering a concentric XLR/1/4" input with 48-volt phantom power. Plug in a condenser vocal mic and the David becomes a powerful pint-sized P.A. (a mount on the cabinet’s bottom allows it be elevated on a speaker tripod). Each of the channels has 3-band active EQ, as well as separate Volume and Reverb controls. There is also a balanced direct out, a 1/4" Line Out, an Aux out, and an Insert jack, which can be used to patch in effects with a TRS-style cable.

I plugged in a “lawsuit” Takamine D-28 knockoff loaded with a Seymour Duncan Woody soundhole pickup, as well as various other piezo-equipped acoustics, and was able to quickly and easily dial in happening sounds with every guitar. The addition of a Warm switch gave some of the raspier piezo tones a much needed smoothing over, but for the most part, the David’s tone controls more than sufficed. There is also a Low Cut switch in the Master section that zaps any boominess and unwieldy bass humps. But again, I found myself able to get everything I needed via the amp’s EQ. The David’s onboard spring reverb blew me away the most. From subtle to over the top, it added a wondrous, airy dimension with the perfect amount of warmth to all of the amp’s tones. If you’re a coffeehouse singer/ songwriter/ guitarist, the David will make your life a lot easier, not only with its diminutive dimensions (13" x 11.5" x 9.5"), but also with its powerful and undeniably musical tones.

Kudos Small. Great sounding. Easy to use.

Concerns None.

Contact Schertler, (+41) 91 630 07 01; 

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