PalmGuitar v2 Composite Guitar Developed For Road Warriors

March 16, 2009

The new “v2” is manufactured by a proprietary, injection molded polyurethane composite process that is designed to match the density and specific gravity of tonewood, without having any of the negative aspects of wood that can cause a guitar to warp, twist or degrade when exposed to the rapid changes in temperature or humidity experienced by frequent travelers. Also, identical wooden guitars right off the production line often vary in tone due to the natural variation in wood structure. Since the v2 is an injection molded synthetic composite, tonal variation from instrument to instrument is eliminated.
To enable such a compact design, the PalmGuitar® v2 uses a shorter than normal scale length of 20 ¼”, but compensates for the short scale by using heavier gauge strings that provide sufficient tension to allow the guitar to be tuned to standard E to E pitch. The guitar weighs 3.6 pounds, is 26” long, 6” wide, and 1.8” thick (the body is 1.2” thick). It uses a single humbucker pickup that can be switched from full humbucker to single coil mode with a rocker switch.
Each PalmGuitar® v2.0 and v2.1 come with a locking leather strap, and a two-compartment padded ballistic nylon gig bag that is easily carried on-board an aircraft. The case dimensions are 28” long x 7” wide x 4” deep, for a combined linear inch dimension of 39”, below most airline carry-on restrictions.  Students, hikers, pilots, and CEO’s are among the company’s most frequent customers.
The PalmGuitar® is available for sale online, direct from the manufacturer at . The PalmGuitar v2.0 sells for $799.95; the v2.1, which adds a carbon fiber reinforced composite strap-balancing arm and leg rest, sells for $899.95. Both are in stock for immediate delivery. All instruments carry a 60-day total customer satisfaction guarantee and a lifetime warranty for the original owner.
Tim Richards, President

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