Marshall Debuts Limited Edition, Handwired Jimi Hendrix Signature Stack

January 20, 2006

"Anyone who truly knew Jimi was well aware of how seriously he took his instruments and equipment," Janie Hendrix, the President/CEO of Experience Hendrix, states. "To achieve the sound he heard playing inside, he had to have the right tools. Gauging from his performances, he clearly embraced Marshall amps. We too embrace Marshall because it allowed us to hear Jimi as we never would have before, with the truest sound and most feeling. We are happy to see the past re-birthed in the form of this Jimi Hendrix signature amp stack. It is our pleasure to partner with Marshall Amplification in giving volume to the legacy of Jimi."

The Jimi Hendrix Stack is sold as a set consisting of the Super 100JH head, the angled 1982AJH 4x12" cabinet and the extra-tall, straight-fronted 1982BJH 4x12" cabinet. The original versions of this iconic, tall, pinstriped stack were built in 1966 and the Super 100 head was the immediate successor to Marshall's first ever 100 Watt head — the dual output transformer JTM45/100, also currently available as the limited edition handwired 40th Anniversary Stack.

Aside from a minor modification to the tone network that Jimi often had implemented, research and discussions with technicians and roadies has revealed that Jimi Hendrix's circa 1966 Super 100 Marshall heads were completely stock. The limited edition Super 100JH head is a meticulous, handwired recreation of such a head, complete with the aforementioned modification to the tone network which adds more treble and bass.

Product Details:
The Super 100JH is an extremely straightforward amplifier. Its two channels — High Treble and Normal — each have two inputs (High and Low sensitivity) and separate Loudness (volume) controls. Both channels share the amplifier's four tone controls: Treble, Middle, Bass and Presence. It contains three ECC83 (12AX7) valves in the preamp and a quartet of KT66 valves in the power amp, the later being standard issue in mid-sixties Marshall amplifiers.

As the mains (power) and output transformers are vital to the performance, sound and feel of an all-valve amplifier, Marshall went to Drake, the company which supplied the transformers used in the original Super 100 heads. Fortunately, all of the original spec documentation remains intact in Drake's archives and the resulting reissue transformers mirror the all-important electrical behavior of the originals exactly.

The Jimi Hendrix Stack's two 4x12 speaker cabinets — the angled 1982AJH and straight 1982BJH — have been designed to recreate the majestic look of the original, pinstriped stacks that Jimi used. Just like the circa 1966 original straight-fronted 1982 cabinet, the 1982BJH is nearly 7" taller than a standard Marshall 4x12", adding further to the impressive look of the stack. Also, just like the original 1982s, both JH cabs are loaded with Celestion G12C 25 Watt speakers, which have been specially developed by Marshall and Celestion to duplicate the sound of the original speakers found in authentic reference cabinets from that era.

The Story Continues — Jim Marshall Meets the Late, Great James Marshall Hendrix:
After hearing and then playing through a Marshall stack for the first time while in London during the autumn of 1966, Jimi Hendrix wanted to meet the maker who shared his first and middle names — James Marshall! As it happened, Jimi's newly recruited drummer, Mitch Mitchell, had worked in one of Jim Marshall's music shops as a "Saturday boy" (a common English term literally meaning what it says, a boy who worked on a Saturday!) and so knew Jim well. Thus, in October of that year Jimi and his band visited the Marshall factory, Mitch introduced Jimi to Jim and a lasting friendship and association was immediately struck. "Despite his somewhat wild appearance and his incredible, larger-than-life onstage persona, Jimi was a very softly spoken and extremely polite young man with a fantastic sense of humor," Mr. Marshall recalls. "We hit it off right away and became good friends." When Jimi left Jim's store he had purchased four 100 Watt Marshall stacks. "He ended up buying several more which I understand he left in different parts of the world so he didn't have to transport them with him when he was touring," Marshall reveals.

"Meeting Jim [Marshall] was beyond groovy for me," Hendrix was quoted as saying about his visit to Marshall. "It was such a relief to talk to someone who knows and cares about sound. Jim really listened to me that day and answered a lot of questions. I love my Marshall amps: I am nothing without them!"

Only 600 Jimi Hendrix Signature Stacks will be available worldwide and each head is individually numbered and comes with a numbered certificate signed by Dr. Jim Marshall OBE. Said certificate and specially prepared manual will come housed in a psychedelic artwork folder designed to look like a gatefold album cover of yesteryear. Each head and cabinet also bears the official Authentic Hendrix logo. Also included is a full set of dust covers featuring Jimi Hendrix's signature.

For more information, visit their web site at

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