Gretsch G. Love Electromatic Corvette

January 1, 2009

Our review model arrived with a spot-on setup and sweet, tuneful intonation. The playing feel is pretty slick overall and the upperfret access is incredible thanks to the long neck block, which puts the 21st fret right where the body begins. This arrangement also places the neck pickup away from a harmonic node, but that doesn’t diminish the cool tones this guitar produces. Everything from twangy bridge pickup bite to burnished neck-pickup textures to full, clear dual-pickup tones are available. The dual Volumes give you full control of pickup balance (though I wouldn’t cite them as the most linear sounding pots), and the master Tone control does a good job of smoothly rolling off the highs without killing the sonic vibe. The simple controls and absence of arcane switches make it easy to get into the twangy coolness of a Gretsch guitar without the fussing that some classic Gretsch models can require. Bottom line, the streamlined G. Love Corevette is particularly good choice for players who are at home with Fender and Gibson guitars, and would like to try a Gretsch model that is just as easy to use. Definitely a hip guitar!

Gretsch Guitars (480) 596-9690;
MODEL G5135GL G. Love Electromatic Corvette
PRICE $1,600 retail/ $1,125 street
NECK Mahogany, set
FRETBOARD 24.6"-scale rosewood
FRETS 21 jumbo
BODY Solid mahogany
PICKUPS Two TV Jones Power ’Tron humbuckers
CONTROLS Dual Volume, master Tone, 3-way pickup selector,
BRIDGE Adjusto-Matic with Bigsby B50 vibrato tailpiece
TUNERS Grover minis
FACTORYSTRINGS D’Addario, .010-.046
WEIGHT 7.6 lbs
KUDOS Cool look. Plays excellent. Superb upper-fret access. Comes stock with TV Jones pickups.
CONCERNS Volume controls don’t have much linear range.
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