June 30, 2010

Eventide announced today the agreement for exclusive worldwide distribution of the Princeton Digital Reverb 2016 bundle and the SST-282 Space Station plug-ins for Pro Tools TDM.  To kick off the new agreement, the Reverb 2016 plug-in bundle will be available for the month of July at a special reduced price of $299 (regularly $699) on Eventide.com and through Eventide authorized software dealers worldwide.  New presets by John Agnello (The Hold Steady, Patty Smith, Dinosaur Jr.), Joe Chicarelli (U2, Elton John, White Stripes), Stewart Lerman (The Roches, Antony and the Johnsons, Crash Test Dummies), and George Massenburg (James Taylor, Billy Joel, Dixie Chicks) have been added.

The Reverb 2016 bundle includes the three algorithms originally included in the SP2016, the first multi-effect processor ever, introduced by Eventide in 1982.  Included are the Stereo Room, Room Reverb, and High Density Plate.  Widely used on hit records for the last three decades, this plug-in suite offers a distinctive palette of reverberant spaces that add that special sparkle to your tracks.

The Space Station SST-282 plug-in, developed in cooperation with the SST-282’s designer, Chris Moore, is a faithful recreation of the Ursa Major Space Station, a three rack-space multi-tap delay-based reverb box introduced in 1981.  Utilizing a unique approach, the Space Station plug-in features two independent groups of delay taps which can be controlled independently to achieve a wide variety of reverberant early reflections, late reflections, and multi-tap delays.  The Space Station SST-282 retails for $499.

About Eventide
Founded in 1971 in New York City, Eventide is a leading developer and manufacturer of digital audio processing products for recording, broadcast, and live performance. Headquartered in Little Ferry, NJ, Eventide invented the H910, the first Harmonizer effects processor in 1975, and introduced the H3000 Ultra-Harmonizer effects processor in 1987. Visit Eventide online at eventide.com.


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