Dunlop Releases the Way Huge Echo-Puss Analog Delay

October 16, 2012
Way Huge founder Jeorge Tripps is a master of delay, having created the most innovative and acclaimed delay circuits released in the last 20 years. His latest creation, the Way Huge Echo-Puss Analog Delay, is designed for players who want an organic analog delay pedal that allows them to fine-tune their delay sound with a simple user interface.

The Way Huge Echo-Puss serves up 600ms of delay with a pair of gravelly-voiced bucket-brigade chips, and a fully tweakable LFO modulation circuit allows playing to add a liquid texture to the sound of the repeats.
This edition is graced with custom artwork from rock n’ roll artist Alan Forbes and is limited to 500 pieces. 
To learn more about the Way Huge Echo-Puss, read an interview with Jeorge Tripps, watch the demo video, and hear sound samples, visit the Dunlop Blog & Echo-Puss Product Page.

Jeorge Tripps founded Way Huge in 1992, using his ear for great tone and an eagerness to go beyond convention to experiment with classic analog pedal designs. The resulting creations—the Red Llama, the Swollen Pickle and the Aqua-Puss among others—became modern classics, praised for their unique tonal character. Since 2009, Tripps has continued his work in partnership with Dunlop Manufacturing. All Way Huge pedals feature true bypass circuitry, through-hole components, sturdy construction and the brain juice of Jeorge Tripps.

Located in Benicia, California, Dunlop Manufacturing, Inc. was founded as a small, family-owned and operated company in 1965, and has since grown to be a leading manufacturer of electronic effects, picks, capos, slides, strings and other musical instrument accessories. Dunlop is the home of such legendary products as the Cry Baby wah effect, Dunlop Strings, Tortex picks, as well as the MXR, Way Huge, and Custom Audio Electronics products lines.
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