D'Addario Expands String Line

January 6, 2006

Electric Bass

  • EXL220S - .040, .060, .075, .095 - addition of popular gauge preferred by many short scale bass players and bass guitar manufacturers. For example, these are standard equipment on all Daisy Rock short scale basses.
  • EXL170-12 - The 12-string bass is back! An influx of new 12-string basses has helped fuel the demand for this classic, mammoth, chorus-like sound.
  • ECB84 - .040, .060, .080, .100 - Demand for D'Addario's Chromes flat wound bass strings has skyrocketed over the past few years. This popular gauge is often-requested by players.
  • ECB81M - Medium scale Chromes flatwound in the most popular gauge: .045, .065, .080, .100.
Electric Guitar
  • EXL116 - Yet another set from D'Addario optimized for standard or drop tuning. Players are clamoring for more options in this category. .011, .014, .018, .030, .042, .052 (a hybrid set of D'Addario's popular EXL115 and EXL140 sets).
  • EHR370 - One of D'Addario's best-selling XL electric set gauges (.011, .014, .018, .028, .038, .049), now available by popular demand in Half Rounds - Stainless steel round wrap is ground semi-flat and polished to a smooth feel.
Mandolin Family
  • J73 - Light gauge .010-.038 phosphor bronze mandolin strings for players who desire the warm tone of phosphor bronze, but with slightly lighter tension than D'Addario's best-selling J74 strings.
  • J72 - Light gauge mandola .014-.049. The popularity of mandola instruments is growing thanks to quality builders like John Monteleone and Will Kimble. This gauge perfectly suits a 16" scale mandola and is the preferred gauge by many professionals.
Specialty Singles
  • CG075 and CG080 Chromes Guitar Flatwound .075 and .080 - ideal for 7-string jazz tunings.
  • CB032 Chromes Bass Flatwound .032 - specially designed for 6-string high C note.
For more information, visit their web site at www.daddario.com.

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