Randy Kohrs Talks Resonator Guitars at the Country Music Hall of Fame

October 26, 2011
On Sunday, October 30, at 1:00pm, Randy Kohrs will be appearing at the Country Music Hall of Fame to demonstrate his much-lauded skills on the resonator guitar, more commonly known as the Dobro.  As one of Nashville’s most sought-after session musicians, his handiwork can be heard on over 600 recordings, ranging from legends such as Dolly Parton, Tom T. Hall, and Hank Thompson, to newer chart-topping acts, including Dierks Bentley, Little Big Town, and the Wreckers. As a side man, he has toured with several of these artists and contributed harmony vocals, as well.
Kohrs’ talents are not limited to that instrument, however, or even that category.  He plays a total of 13 different instruments – lap steel, acoustic guitar, banjo, for example - and often shows up to sessions with several of them, giving producers plenty to choose from when sculpting songs for an artist. That also happens to be another one of his expertise. Kohrs is a Grammy-winning producer and recording engineer (Jim Lauderdale’s The Bluegrass Diaries), with several nominations under his belt, additionally.  His own recording facility, Slack Key Studio, is steadily rising in popularity, hosting acts from around the world, and on any given day, the top musicians in town can be found tracking there.
Though Kohrs may be popular behind-the-scenes, as an artist in the Bluegrass/Americana/Country world, he has topped several charts with his five solo CD’s. The Randy Kohrs Band has toured the country, playing some of its largest festivals. Though he has taken the year off of touring to concentrate on his studio and to record a more contemporary country album, which is still in the works, his band will be performing on Friday, November 11th, at the Station Inn in Nashville.
For more information, please visit www.countrymusichalloffame.org and www.randykohrs.com.
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